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From: Nancy Trent/Pam Wadler
Trent & Company, Inc.
594 Broadway, Suite 901
(212) 966-0024
pam@trentandcompany.com

For: adMISSION POSSIBLE®

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

AP
 

FACTS YOU CAN USE FROM adMISSION POSSIBLE®

GUIDANCE COUNSELOR STATISTICS

STUDENT TO COUNSELOR RATIOS/UNDERSTAFFING:

Public Agenda Report for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation: "Can I Get a Little Advice Here? How an Overstretched High School Guidance System Is Undermining Students' College Aspirations" By Jean Johnson and Jon Rochkind with Amber N. Ott and Samantha DuPont

• "Although professional groups such as the American School Counselor Association say that a student-counselor ratio of 250 to 1 is optimal, this is far from the typical state of affairs in most public schools. In California, the ratio is closer to 1,000 students for every counselor available. In Arizona, Minnesota, Utah and the District of Columbia, the ratio is typically more than 700 to 1. Nationwide, the average is 460 to 1." (p. 3) – American School Counselor Association. "2007-2008 Student to Counselor Ratios." Retrieved from: www.schoolcounselor.org.

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Report: "School Counselors Have Come to a 'Crossroads'" Eric Hoover. November 15, 2011

• "[Today's counselors are] lacking the support they need to help more students go to college." (p. 1)

• "Eighty-five percent of counselors surveyed said ensuring that students graduate and succeed in college or careers should be a top priority, yet only 30 percent saw this as their school's mission." (p. 1) (College Board's National Office for School Counselor Advocacy. Report based on a national survey of 5,308 middle- and high-school counselors).

• "35 percent of all counselors – and 43 percent of those in lower-income schools – do not think they have the support and resources to succeed in promoting college and career readiness." (p. 1)

• "Nearly 75 percent of respondents said supporting students in their pursuit of postsecondary goals was among their most important tasks, yet only 42 percent said schools take full advantage of this role." (p. 1)

• "A majority said they would like to spend more time on career counseling and academic planning – and less time on administrative tasks." (p. 1)

THE CONSEQUENCES OF COUNSELORS NOT HAVING ENOUGH TIME

College Admissions Partners: "The Limitations of High School Counselors for College Admissions" Todd Johnson. March 3, 2010. Blog: www.college admissionspartners.com

• "According to a report from the National Association for College Admission Counseling, the average high school counselor spends 38 minutes a year on each student's search for the right college." (p. 2)

The Education Trust: "Poised to Lead: How School Counselors Can Drive College and Career Readiness" December, 2001 The Education Trust.

• "In the MetLife Survey of the American teacher, 65 percent of high school students acknowledge school counselors as one of the top three sources of information on what success in college requires. Unfortunately, the vast majority of students are not getting this information until the 11th or 12th grade. This is much too late for this information to be most effective." (p. 3) (MetLife, "The MetLife Survey of The American Teacher: Preparing Students for College and Careers" (New York: MetLife, 2011), 16,

Public Agenda: "Why Guidance Counseling Needs to Change" April 1, 2010

• "Studies have shown that guidance counselors do not necessarily spend most of their time advising students (McDonough, 2004a, 2004b; U.S. Department of Education, 2004). Much of their day is devoted to administrative tasks, discipline issues, and untangling scheduling snafus, according to experts on the profession. Many counselors are involved in overseeing testing programs, along with lunch duty, attendance monitoring, and substitute teaching. Under the current system, public schools often seem to assume that counselors can juggle a whole roster of duties and still effectively assist hundreds of students in planning their futures." (p. 1)

National Association of Peer College Advisors, www.napcaonline.org

• Inadequate school counseling programs lead to the unanticipated stratification of low-income and students of color as they bear the brunt of this problem." (p. 1)

NEGATIVE OUTCOMES FOR STUDENTS:

Public Agenda: "Why Guidance Counseling Needs to Change" April 1, 2010. Students who don't have real access to college admissions counseling are:

• Less likely to say they chose their college because they believed that it would help them get a good job on graduation (48 percent versus 64 percent).

• Less likely to say that they chose their college on the basis of financial aid that was offered to them (32 percent versus 44 percent).

• More likely to say that they would have gone to a different college if money were not an issue (46 percent versus 35 percent).

• Less likely to say that they chose their college on the basis of its academic reputation (41 percent versus 51 percent).

• Less likely to go to college directly after high school (39 percent versus 54 percent).

The Chronicle of Higher Education: Report: "School Counselors Have Come to a 'Crossroads'" Eric Hoover. November 15, 2011

• "At 'high poverty' schools, only 19 percent of counselors said college and career readiness was part of their school's mission." (p. 1)

National Association for College Admission Counseling: "Counseling and College Counseling in America's High Schools," Patricia M. McDonough, January, 2005

• "African American and Latino students are significantly more likely to have their college plans influenced by their high school counselors (Lee and Ekstrom, 1987; Plank and Jordan, 2001)." (p. 19)

• "Repeated studies have found that improving counseling would have a significant impact on college access for low-income, rural, and urban students as well as students of color (Gandara and Bial 2001; King, 1996; Plank and Jordan, 2001; Rosenbaum, Miller, and Krei, 1996; Venezia et al., 2003)." (p. 23)

Public Agenda Report for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation: "Can I Get a Little Advice Here? How an Overstretched High School Guidance System Is Undermining Students' College Aspirations" By Jean Johnson and Jon Rochkind with Amber N. Ott and Samantha DuPont

• "For young people from less well-educated, lower-income families, the ability to know and talk to adults who are familiar with the higher education system can be essential." (p. 9)

• "Public Agenda research has shown repeatedly that the vast majority of lower-income and less well-educated parents have high educational aspirations for their children. Even so, these families may not have enough in-depth practical knowledge about how the system works to give their children the best advice. In such cases, access to an attentive and knowledgeable guidance counselor can be decisive." (p. 9)

• "72 percent said that 'the opportunity to talk with advisers who know all about the different college and job-training programs so you can make a good choice' would help 'a lot.' Those numbers rise to 91 percent among young African-Americacns and 82 percent among young Hispanics." (p. 11)

THE REASON TO GO TO COLLEGE
The Chronicle of Higher Education: "The Value Gap," January 11, 2012.

• "The reason so many students want to go to college, and the reason so many families are willing to pay anything for it, is the lifetime payoff of a degree: A typical bachelor's degree recipient earns about 66% more than a high-school graduate during a 40-year career." (p. 1)

 

EDITORS NOTE: To speak with Marjorie Hansen Shaevitz or for more information about adMISSION POSSIBLE®, please contact Nancy Trent or Pamela Wadler at 212-966-0024 or pam@trentandcompany.com.

 

 
   

 

 
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